The Product Landing

They say the hardest thing about flying is landing. That made me think about the language we use in product development, in particular the product launch metaphor. Can a term like that in itself drive us to do things we don’t want to do?

Space shuttle launch

There flies your better judgement

To recap, a Product Launch is supposed to encompass a number of coordinated efforts, including things like:

  • Optimising the technology for heavy loads
  • Going big on marketing
  • Omnipresence in press and social media, roadshows, exhibitions, etc
  • Community building, content curation, customer service
  • (and much more)

Ideally, we are well prepared before the product launch. We may have iterated under the radar with “early adopter” customers, but now it’s finally time to create a big bang and become as instantaneously successful as Pokemon Go, with its more than 10 million downloads within the first week of release. Awesome!

Pokemon Go

Who needs to iterate when we can Pokemon Go for it

It doesn’t have to be this way. In fact, most experienced entrepreneurs would do anything to avoid it. Aiming for a product launch is a beginners mistake, but in the world of entrepreneurship there are a lot of beginners. Why has the all or nothing approach to product release become an ideal so strong that we continue doing it, or pretend to be doing it, despite overwhelming experiences telling us to work differently?

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Colic-driven Development

The idea behind the Oslo Opera House came after a role switch. When first opened eight years ago, visitors were presented with a fairy tale, allowing everybody to literally walk on top of the glacier-like surface of the building before being lured inside, into an adventurous quest for the “Hall of the Mountain King” (According to Norwegian folklore, The Mountain King normaly resides inside the Dovrefjell mountain range, who’s highest peak – Snøhetta – incidentally has the same name as the architect company that drew the Opera House). It was an iconic building that soon became a part of the identity of Oslo, and the web site still melts down twice a year, when next season’s tickets are out.

It’s a glacier. You’re supposed to walk on top of it

So how did they come up with this idea?

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Lean summer of 2015 – Week 6

Can 6 tech students help a telecom giant innovate in 6 weeks? Telenor Norway wants to solve real problems for real people. As summer interns in Iterate – the lean startup consultancy in Norway – we’ve been hired to build, measure and learn how to unleash the power of future telco technology. Every week we blog about what we’ve learned.

Here’s week 6.

Our Lean summer has come to an end.

Six weeks ago we were given a task; to help Telenor innovate in different areas. With the rise in popularity and functionality of webRTC, Telenor wanted to know whether or not this technology could help.

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Six nervous students preparing for their first day

We didn’t expect this project to be easy, and didn’t expect it to go without issues or problems. We expected guidance, but we also hoped for some freedom to try and fail for ourselves. Mistakes are a great opportunity to learn, but only if we can make and solve them on our own..

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Six great friends enjoying a last party together before going their separate ways

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Lean Summer of 2015 – Week 5

Can 6 tech students help a telecom giant innovate in 6 weeks? Telenor Norway wants to solve real problems for real people. As summer interns in Iterate – the lean startup consultancy in Norway – we’ve been hired to build, measure and learn how to unleash the power of future telco technology. Every week we blog about what we’ve learned.

Here’s week 5.

Navigating the corporate jungle.

Compared to the real world, student life is easy. We are free to do almost whatever we want, when we want to. You never really have guilt-free time off, but you also don’t have to get up early every day.

For many of us, summer internships are the first taste of a real job. We would soon discover that getting up early would be the easy part.

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How many interns does it take to fire up a grill? One to light it and four to watch it in silence and scare away the seagulls

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Lean Summer of 2015 – Week 3

Can 6 tech students help a telecom giant innovate in 6 weeks? Telenor Norway wants to solve real problems for real people. As summer interns in Iterate – the lean startup consultancy in Norway – we’ve been hired to build, measure and learn how to unleash the power of future telco technology. Every week we blog about what we’ve learned.

Here’s week 3.

We knew from the beginning this internship was going to be different.

Most tech student summer internships follow a standard format: You show up the first day to a round of introductions, you get assigned a workstation, a task, and maybe some company swag. The first week is focused on workshops and courses, and then you are set to work. For the next few weeks you work on your project in order to bring it to completion on time.

Certainly a cool internship when you get to brew your own beer and design a matching label.

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The values of innovation

They say groups make bad decisions. That’s why we need leadership.

The solution might be a team leader, who makes decisions on behalf of the group: Limit decision power, and decisions will become consistent, on target and effective.

This works great in a number of circumstances. In a restaurant kitchen, for instance, nobody wants chefs who disagree on how long to cook the aspargus. People are hungry – we need a ruler.

Conversely, a ruler is a disaster in innovation. To creative minds, pursuing “the next big thing” (whatever it may be), nothing pacifies more than a micromanaging split- and conquer regime.

Give them a clear objective, a business goal, you might say. “Increase market share by 20% over the next 18 months”. If the goal is realistic, they may reach it. But will it be innovation?

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Lean Startup: Safe failure vs failure

A Lean Startup has three possible outcomes:

  1. We found a winning product (success)
  2. We learned our idea was a bad one, and did something else (safe failure)
  3. We messed up and failed to seize opportunities (big failure)

Thinking like a Lean Startup, we value fast failure, because it teaches us important lessons that in turn can be used to find a winning product. Big failure, however, is when we fail to implement the thinking in the first place. Big failure encompasses anything from never getting getting started in the first place to greenfield innovation initiatives that – usually seen in retrospect – never could have made it, because they were built on the wrong premises.

This post is about avoiding big failure.

I meet a lot of corporate people who want to learn Lean Startup these days. They mostly expect training in experimentation: Business modelling, customer dialog, minimal (viable) product design and other means for validated learning. Build, measure, learn.

The truth is that learning basic skills of Lean Startup isn’t really that hard. Effective use of cheap learning material, from books and tutorials (and even board games) to Meetups and conferences, will get you a long way. Getting mentored by someone who’s done it before may get you even further, but you’re still traveling along one axis of a multi-dimensional challenge. Experimentatiton skills are the hiking shoes you need to climb the mountain (and as far as I know, no hiking shoes have ever climbed a mountain).

And the horrible truth is:

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